An analysis of the potato in michael pollans book the botany of desire a plants eye view of the worl

We may have learned plenty, but the plants have learned as well: make a flashier flower, a tastier tuber and those humans will do just what you want. Since my collar bone was not broken, I got up and walked home. But the Bible didn't have a bad word to say about the apple or even the strong drink that could be made from it. All rights reserved From Library Journal Plants are important to us for many reasons. Despite the rather "hokey horror film" premise of Pollan's introduction, the book is a smart yet entertaining look at plants and their history of coevolution and codependence with human beings. Recommended for all types of libraries. If biodiversity can't scale up in size to industrial farming system needs, should we alter the system size downward? Is one way inherently better than another? This was an essentially substanceless book. The book explains that man and nature are and will always be "in this boat together" because humankind's nurturing over the last 10, years benefits as much from us as we do from them. The Botany of Desire proposes that people and domesticated plants have formed a similarly reciprocal relationship. Apples we grow for sweetness, and sweetness surrounds our image of Johnny Appleseed, but Pollan shows that this strange character was not delivering apple orchards to the pioneers as much as he was delivering the alcoholic beverage cider, and incidentally he was making preserves of wild apple trees. Ablaze with this transformational vision, Pollan intertwines history, anecdote, and revelation as he investigates the connection between four plants that have thrived under human care--apples, tulips, marijuana, and potatoes--and the four human desires they satisfy in return: sweetness, beauty, intoxication, and control. And in Northern New Hampshire, an independent-minded apple grower, who raises a variety of antique apples, hopes to revive the market for that once vilified drink, hard apple cider.

At first, this is a very attractive idea, but with further thought it does not hold up. Growing up, my father regularly told me the same thing.

An analysis of the potato in michael pollans book the botany of desire a plants eye view of the worl

All those plants care about is what every being cares about on the most basic genetic level: making more copies of itself By exploring the history of these four familiar plants, the film seeks to answer the question: Who really has been domesticating whom? It wasn't until after that the apple became the fruit we know today. Unlike most apple growers, tulip gardeners are constantly exploring new varieties of tulips. He uses the history of John Chapman Johnny Appleseed to illustrate how both the apple's sweetness and its role in the production of alcoholic cider made it appealing to settlers moving west, thus greatly expanding the plant's range. What if it had been "broccoli today keeps the doctor away? Wine figured in the Eucharist; also, the Old Testament warned against the temptations of the grape. What about food systems in malnourished countries? Discussion Questions Early Peruvians adapted to nature in their attempts to domesticate potatoes. Scientists in Geneva, New York, are trying to help the apple prosper with fewer pesticides by harnessing the defenses that lie hidden in its genes. Pollan explains the surprising fact that apples rarely pass on their flavor or even their appearance through their seeds. I am not unfamiliar with this thinking.

And in a interesting aside, he explains how a global desire for consistently perfect French fries contributes to both damaging monoculture and the genetic engineering necessary to support it. To the general public?

This was the "broomstick" by which these women were said to travel.

the botany of desire a plants eye view of the world pdf

If people really knew what this corporation was moving toward, they would rebel en mass. What are the similarities and differences? It wasn't until after that the apple became the fruit we know today.

The omnivores dilemma

And in Northern New Hampshire, an independent-minded apple grower, who raises a variety of antique apples, hopes to revive the market for that once vilified drink, hard apple cider. Are there long-term ramifications for these two differing approaches to farming? I remember Michael Pollan as Michael "Pollen" because of his "seeding" impact to attitude and thought. Copyright Cahners Business Information, Inc. Pollan claims that that the plants we domesticate have evolved to please our senses and thus encourage us to grow them in vast amounts, in effect, helping them to propagate. Explain what you mean. Do you participate in them? While fruits produce sweetness and flowers produce beauty, some plants produce chemicals that have the power to alter human consciousness. Is the conclusion always the same? You will talk about this book and recommend it to others. Unlike most of the commercial apple trees cultivated today, which are grown by grafting buds onto young tree stalks, Chapman's apple trees — as you might expect from his nickname — were grown from apple seeds. A bon bon, a froth and frosting, lacking any substance. Many successful natural history books take solid, long-known ideas and put them across to the public in an effective, way. What might those ramifications be? In the process, he casts new light on the legend of Johnny Appleseed.

The trees are always hoping we'll drop dead. What are the factors that led you to form your opinion? Editorial Reviews Amazon.

in defense of food

In 19th century America, it was a common treatment for labor pains, asthma and rheumatism. We also get gems like this: [Witches'] potion recipes called for such things as datura, opium poppies, belladonna, hashish, fly-agaric mushrooms, and the skins of toads.

second nature (book)

This was an essentially substanceless book.

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The Botany of Desire