Editorial writing assignment for middle school

Not only does it help students develop writing skills, but also helps them develop their own point of view about the subject at hand. Have your students research their selected topics further. Remind them that an opinion is a belief held by a person, whereas a fact is a specific statement which can be proven true.

Here are some interesting editorial topics that focus on current affairs. Make your writing clear and easy to understand.

Editorial format example

Remind them that an opinion is a belief held by a person, whereas a fact is a specific statement which can be proven true. What suggestions do you have for the author of this editorial? Conclusion: How will you close and wrap up this editorial? Choose a subject that you're familiar with; something that you know the inside out of, so that you can provide an in-depth analysis of the same. Remind your class to include each part of an editorial. Or, use the handouts and ideas in our post An Argument-Writing Unit: Crafting Student Editorials , in which Kayleen Everitt, an eighth-grade English teacher, has her students take on advertising the same way. For more detail about the nitty-gritty of the research process, the Online Writing Lab at Purdue University provides a guide to conducting research that can be helpful with areas such as evaluating source reliability and doing Internet searches. It begins this way: Here at the Op-Ed page, there are certain questions that are as constant as the seasons. A List of Interesting Editorial Topics for High School Students These days, being the editor of the school newspaper is a very coveted position to have. Here is an organizer for their use: Editorial topic: Reason 1 and support Be sure to use facts and not just opinions. The second suggests ways for students to discover their own voices on the issues they care about. Have each student select a topic, and then research and write a rough draft of an editorial. Step 3: Brainstorm a list of editorial topics. Students can read their editorials to the class or in groups.

The answer, he argued, was three principles: ethos, pathos, and logos. It begins this way: Here at the Op-Ed page, there are certain questions that are as constant as the seasons.

How to write an editorial for high school students

If you write a good editorial, people are going to respond to it. On separate sheets of paper, ask them to list facts that support their opinion about their topic of choice. What evidence does it use to make its argument? Students may want make annotations or use highlighters as they read, then discuss their findings as a class. Should the ants have shown more compassion to the hungry grasshopper in the dead of winter? How persuasive do you find the editorial? Know your bottom line. That might mean reading newspaper articles, consulting an encyclopedia, finding reliable websites or reaching out to an expert to make sure they have enough context about why their topic is important to write a strong persuasive essay. Secondly, it improves their knowledge of history.

Alternatively, if students plan to offer a solution to a problem in their editorial, they may want to use our Problem-Solution Organizer PDF. For more detail about the nitty-gritty of the research process, the Online Writing Lab at Purdue University provides a guide to conducting research that can be helpful with areas such as evaluating source reliability and doing Internet searches.

editorial examples for middle school

Have students choose an editorial to read on their own or as a whole class.

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How to Write an Editorial: Your Students' Opinions Matter!